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Q&A

How do I get vegan "cheese" to melt?

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I sometimes cook for someone who needs to avoid milk products, so I got some plant-based "cheese" (listed as cultured vegan cheese) to use instead of the real thing. I'm having trouble getting it to melt properly; is that just how these imitation cheeses are, or does it require a different technique or temperature?

I first tried melting it on sandwiches (veggie burgers). For real cheese, if I'm warming up the burgers in the microwave, I can add cheese slices for the last minute of cooking time and I get nicely-melted cheese on the patty. With this cheese, after a minute it was warm but no less rigid, and after two minutes it was barely getting soft. At that point I was overcooking the burgers, so I stopped.

I then tried using it in an omelette. Mindful of the sandwich disappointment, I added the cheese, in small pieces, to the skillet before the eggs. (Heated oil, sauteed onions, added cheese partway through, and when the onions were soft I added the eggs and proceeded as usual.) Some of the cheese was melted, some wasn't. It didn't taste bad, but I was surprised that some bits of cheese were still more toward the solid end of the scale.

Is vegan cheese just not expected to melt well, and I should be focusing on ways to use it cold? Or is there a trick I'm not getting right? Or are there differences in vegan cheeses and I bought one that's not good for this purpose?

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4 answers

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I believe you will find this article both entertaining and useful: https://www.seriouseats.com/the-food-lab-vegan-nacho-sauce-as-good-as-the-real-thing-recipe-vegan-experience

(the recipe alone is at https://www.seriouseats.com/gooey-vegan-nacho-cheese-sauce-recipe-food-lab )

It documents the process of developing a vegan cheese sauce suitable for nachos, burgers, potatoes, mac-n-cheese, and so forth.

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Vegan cheese is simply a non-dairy cheese, and it is available in various types such as Daiya, mozzarella, parmesan, and cheddar. These various kinds of cheeses are delicious, especially when melted the right way. Remember, some vegan cheeses have a hard texture. As such, you have to melt them to get a creamy texture. From there, you can top the melted cheese on your favorite vegan meals. So, how do you melt them the right way? Here are some ways to melt vegan cheese.

ON A STOVE One of the best ways to melt vegan cheese is to use a stove-top. In this method, you’ll need two types of vegan cheeses, like Parmesan and mozzarella, and unsweetened almond milk.

The first step is to grate the two types of vegan cheeses into a plate or bowl. Keep in mind that you’ll be able to melt the cheese quickly if it is grated. Afterwards, place a non-stick pan on the stove. Medium heat is preferred to avoid burning the cheese. From there, add the cheese into the pan together with a little bit of the unsweetened almond milk. Using a spatula, stir the mixture until they form a smooth and creamy sauce. If the sauce is a bit runny, you can add more cheese to get a thicker consistency.

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This very much depends on what sort of vegan cheese you're using.

Personally, having only used store-bought name-brand vegan cheese, I find that Violife shreds are easy to melt between bread slices in a sandwich press (for grilled cheese). For cheeseburgers, Violife and Aldi brand slices have to be left out of the fridge for a few minutes prior to being placed on top of the patty. Daiya slices don't melt well. I haven't tried other brands or home-made cheese.

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The reason for this, according to The Takeout, is that vegan cheese lacks casein, the protein that causes regular dairy cheese to melt. For more information www.shreecateres.in

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