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Q&A

How does shaking raw sea cucumber in a box for more than an hour, deliver a unique texture?

+3
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I don't speak any Asian language. Why shake raw sea cucumbers "in a box for more than an hour to deliver a unique texture"? What's the science behind this?

吃喝玩樂 - Diary of a Growing Boy: A s(chl)ong for Valentine

Appetizer: sea cucumber, grated turnip gelée, young spring onion (先付:生子、蕪おろしジュレ、浅月) - the raw sea cucumbers were apparently shaken in a box for more than an hour to deliver a unique texture.  Japanese people do like their sea cucumber raw, but it makes for a texture that's kinda hard to bite through.  The acidity from the gélée accompanied the sea cucumber well, and I did taste some kick from the kuroshichimi (黒七味) from Hararyokaku (原了郭) in Kyoto.

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+5
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Consider what you are doing: repeatedly smashing protein structures. That's usually called "tenderizing". The unusual bit is the technique and the length of time prescribed.

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I wonder if sea cucumbers have more delicate collagen structures and therefore "shaking" is longer and gentler, producing better results than simply pounding them (the normal tenderization technique). Sigma‭ 6 months ago

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