Communities

Writing
Writing
Codidact Meta
Codidact Meta
The Great Outdoors
The Great Outdoors
Photography & Video
Photography & Video
Scientific Speculation
Scientific Speculation
Cooking
Cooking
Electrical Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Judaism
Judaism
Languages & Linguistics
Languages & Linguistics
Software Development
Software Development
Mathematics
Mathematics
Christianity
Christianity
Code Golf
Code Golf
Music
Music
Physics
Physics
Linux Systems
Linux Systems
Power Users
Power Users
Tabletop RPGs
Tabletop RPGs
tag:snake search within a tag
answers:0 unanswered questions
user:xxxx search by author id
score:0.5 posts with 0.5+ score
"snake oil" exact phrase
votes:4 posts with 4+ votes
created:<1w created < 1 week ago
post_type:xxxx type of post
Search help
Notifications
Mark all as read See all your notifications »
Q&A

Post History

77%
+5 −0
Q&A Why is my bread now deflating when I slash vents before baking?

If cooking is chemistry, baking sits on the border with biology. Factors that could be an issue: humidity in your refrigerator humidity in your kitchen the current balance of yeast ...

posted 1y ago by dsr‭  ·  edited 1y ago by Sigma not mod‭

Answer
#2: Post edited by user avatar Sigma not mod‭ · 2021-06-27T02:01:48Z (over 1 year ago)
add another option
  • If cooking is chemistry, baking sits on the border with biology.
  • Factors that *could* be an issue:
  • - humidity in your refrigerator
  • - humidity in your kitchen
  • - the current balance of yeast to bacteria in your starter
  • - the activity of your starter, which is both temperature related and just based on how happy those microorganisms are
  • The rise of your bread is determined by the amount of carbon dioxide released during fermentation of available starches, the distribution of those bubbles in a gluten network, and the timing of the two. I hypothesize that a slightly warmer kitchen has led to an earlier peak in CO2 levels, which formed larger bubbles. When you slashed the tops, more CO2 was released than usual and the bubble-caverns collapsed more than usual. Note that rye has less gluten in it to begin with than wheat, more free sugars (so fermentation produces more CO2) and more amylase to break down starch into sugar (so it will get sticky faster than wheat).
  • You might want to try:
  • - rise your rye dough in a cooler place
  • - add a small amount of white vinegar or lemon juice to your recipe. Acidulation reduces amylase activity, and as a result, lots of rye bread recipes incorporate some vinegar
  • - reduce any sugars you add to the rye dough
  • Good luck!
  • If cooking is chemistry, baking sits on the border with biology.
  • Factors that *could* be an issue:
  • - humidity in your refrigerator
  • - humidity in your kitchen
  • - the current balance of yeast to bacteria in your starter
  • - the activity of your starter, which is both temperature related and just based on how happy those microorganisms are
  • The rise of your bread is determined by the amount of carbon dioxide released during fermentation of available starches, the distribution of those bubbles in a gluten network, and the timing of the two. I hypothesize that a slightly warmer kitchen has led to an earlier peak in CO2 levels, which formed larger bubbles. When you slashed the tops, more CO2 was released than usual and the bubble-caverns collapsed more than usual. Note that rye has less gluten in it to begin with than wheat, more free sugars (so fermentation produces more CO2) and more amylase to break down starch into sugar (so it will get sticky faster than wheat).
  • You might want to try:
  • - rise your rye dough in a cooler place
  • - add a small amount of white vinegar or lemon juice to your recipe. Acidulation reduces amylase activity, and as a result, lots of rye bread recipes incorporate some vinegar
  • - reduce any sugars you add to the rye dough
  • - use slightly less of the sourdough starter, as this will cause the bread to rise more slowly and have smaller bubbles
  • Good luck!
#1: Initial revision by user avatar dsr‭ · 2021-05-27T23:31:09Z (over 1 year ago)
If cooking is chemistry, baking sits on the border with biology.

Factors that *could* be an issue:

- humidity in your refrigerator

- humidity in your kitchen

- the current balance of yeast to bacteria in your starter

- the activity of your starter, which is both temperature related and just based on how happy those microorganisms are

The rise of your bread is determined by the amount of carbon dioxide released during fermentation of available starches, the distribution of those bubbles in a gluten network, and the timing of the two. I hypothesize that a slightly warmer kitchen has led to an earlier peak in CO2 levels, which formed larger bubbles. When you slashed the tops, more CO2 was released than usual and the bubble-caverns collapsed more than usual. Note that rye has less gluten in it to begin with than wheat, more free sugars (so fermentation produces more CO2) and more amylase to break down starch into sugar (so it will get sticky faster than wheat).

You might want to try:

- rise your rye dough in a cooler place

- add a small amount of white vinegar or lemon juice to your recipe. Acidulation reduces amylase activity, and as a result, lots of rye bread recipes incorporate some vinegar

- reduce any sugars you add to the rye dough

Good luck!